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outspoken about human rights in russia. "she has been traveling with a business contingent of her trip has not just been about the euro. the ruble. >> they passed a resolution that underscored fears about the kremlin's commitment. >> vladimir putin as an less than happy to hear the criticism. clutched kendel merkel was expecting a chilly reception and. >> at a joint conference with business leaders, questions from the audience quickly turned to what many here see as an increasingly critical tone that germany and europe are taking with russia. >> she was surprisingly candid in her assessment. >> she said, we are concerned and it is my view as well that the kremlin has adopted a series of laws that do not do anything to promote principles such as the right of political groups to organize freely. she highlighted the two-year prison sentence given to members of the rock band pussy riot as a decision europeans could not understand. he said they were not track actively suppress civil society and talked about the growing tensions. he said, we disagree, arguing, and search for compromise but there
of russia today, assad about offers of safe passage to another country in exchange for leaving power. >> he warned that foreign intervention in syria would have a domino impact around the world. we begin with the latest. >> here is where the first protests of assad took place. this video claims to show the result of a government air strike on the city's great mosque. meanwhile, rebels say they have taken one of the two remaining government-controlled posts along the turkish border. in a rare interview, bashar al- assad was defiant. speaking to russian television, he ruled out the possibility he might go into exile. >> i am syrian. i will live and die in syria. >> assad warned the west against military intervention in the country and said such a move would have global ramifications and warned any intervention would have what he called a domino effect. meanwhile, syrian opposition politicians are meeting in the qatari capital to try to form a unified group. the opposition is under pressure from the west to create a government in waiting that would be ready to take over if and when assad is no
always spoke of russia in negative terms. of course i did not like that. that is why i was rooting for obama to win. >> obama always said he did not want another cold war, and that is a huge positive for the relationship between the u.s. and russia. the reaction from the kremlin was less enthusiastic. after putin was reelected, several meetings were scheduled and then canceled until he finally met with obama this summer. moscow was struggling to maintain its status as a world power, and that has made for confrontation with washington on a number of issues, from the war in syria to missile defense in europe. >> here, that ties are viewed as the norm, but that is not normal. it does damage. it prevents russia from fulfilling important tasks, especially the long-overdue process of modernization. >> right now, putin is keeping tight control on things at home, and he uses his opposition to america to rally the masses behind him. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for internation
between germany and russia by some measures is at its worst in decades. has there been a real break down between russia and the west as pew ten has come back into office? >> i don't believe there's been a break down. i think the perception of russia has been difficult from western investors. when you see human rights case come up, people get a bit more nervous. but general employeeliemployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayl emplo russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayemploye russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todaymployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayployee a is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayloyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayoyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayyee i f st
were reported killed in this attack alone. russia's foreign minister met with jordan's foreign minister. he also held private talks with the former syrian prime minister. the former assad ally defected to the opposition in august. he faces tough questions about why russia continues to supply assad with weapons. >> we are only honoring contracts that were agreed some time ago. the supplies have nothing to do with the current conflict. they are merely supposed to help syria provide for its own defense. that includes defending itself against air attacks. >> that sort of rhetoric rings hollow to many in syria. for them, the deaths of friends and family have become a daily reality. >> in germany, reports are coming in the prosecutors are bringing charges against a surviving member of a suspected neo-nazi terror cell. >> he is suspected of being a member of a cell that killed at least 10 people, nine of them with immigrant roots between 2000 and 2007. both of his accomplices committed suicide last year. the murder spree caused outrage in the country and prompted the country to overhaul securi
, his efforts are already having an effect. >> in russia, a new law has come into force, requiring organizations that receive funding from abroad to register as foreign agents. dam it conscious of the days of the cold war, and the affected groups are not at all happy about those implications. >> many plan to boycott the law, including an election watchdog. >> this russian election watchdog now has to declare itself a foreign agent because it receives funding from the u.s. and europe. >> it is clear to us that any group that does not register as an agent and is viewed as a nuisance by the state apparatus will be first to be put through the wringer by the authorities. >> the new law passed through parliament during the summer with virtually no public outcry. it is backed by the ruling united russia party, which is allied to president vladimir putin. supporters of the law say it is simply a way to identify groups involved in russian politics who use funds from overseas. >> i do not think it is repression. it is just a way of classifying politically active citizens groups. may be someo
to play a larger role in putting an end to the violence in syria. >> china and russia have long blocked the u.n. security council from putting pressure on damascus. yang said the crisis in syria needs a political solution. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton says that kosovo's independence is not up for discussion. clinton and the eu foreign policy chief met with the kosovan present. >> clinton and ashton are touring balkan countries currently. london's police may be selling their famous new scotland yard headquarters to cut costs. they need to find over 600 million euros of savings and help the complex can fetch a large chunk of that sum. >> city police moved into the iconic building on victoria street in 1967. with staff cuts on the way, they will not need as much space. >> we will be back in one minute with more. >> stick around. we will be right back. >> welcome back. it is deja vu all over again. florida and ohio are expected to be key swing states in determining the outcome of the u.s. presidential election. >> some are saying that romney must win florida to win the race. the
that more caution is still advise. >> in russia, speculation is rife about the health of vladimir putin. this after the russian president canceled his traditional end of the year call-in show. >> he was also seen living in public. the kremlin says he's fine, but not everyone is convinced. >> in these images from state television, putin seems to be in discomfort. >> i read something on the internet, but i do not think he is seriously ill. everyone has the odd a campaign. >> by september, putin had a noticeable limp. the kremlin said he had pulled a muscle doing judo. >> that is something putin has painstakingly avoided in his 30 years as russia's most powerful politician. he has always been keen to project an image of himself as a virile and vulnerable leader. >> putin will do anything to say in power. anyone who has power clings to it. >> another source of pain might be the latest opinion polls. they suggest that only 15% of russians approve of the way he is running the country. >> well, some sports news now. in formula one racing, sebastian fettle will be looking to take another step t
won. that is the first myth. frankly, of russia won it. secondly common and and and and now we have the atomic bomb. new -- secondly, we have the atomic bomb. these are myths we explode, but what results is this believe we are always in the right, and it has gotten worse from generation to generation. tavis: if oliver is right and we engage in this self love, what makes you think that of bowdon -- a book that they are going to want to digest that? >> you do not think it is going to change the world? we just want to start a conversation. we think people in the united states have not studied their history. the national report card, most americans think the united states is sufficient -- is deficient in math and science. high school seniors are weakest in u.s. history, and the public in general knows very little u.s. history. tavis: what makes you think we are ready for that conversation now. >> the united states is in a transitional time. we cannot dictate all over the world. we are just in the process of losing two major wars. it is a terrible war. if the united states gets involved
. not to cross it, because that might bring china into the war. not to do anything to aggravate russia. russia was greedy for any colonies, anything it could grab. and i am not going to give you the atom bomb. you are not going to be able to use it. three things he was told. macarthur said, do not worry, the chinese are not coming in. he got our army up to the 38th parallel. a decision was made. the white house knew -- they decided to cross the parallel to get into north korea and destroy the north korean army. this was an agreed upon decision. we did indeed push back the north koreans. but it triggered the chinese, who came rushing in, hundreds of thousands, truman said, i was promised they would not come in. intelligence told macarthur this would not happen. here we are, fighting hundreds of thousands of chinese. they pushed us all the way back. >> back to seoul? >> beyond. they took seoul back. macarthur started to give press conferences. he asked for the use of the bomb. truman said now. truman did not think -- instead of calling macarthur back, he decided to fly to wake island. he sat wit
three command-and-control servers. one venezuela, one in russia and when the state senate commands for the virus u.s. intelligence concluded with high degree of confidence that the virus was developed by state-sponsored actors and ask land and not a high degree of confidence, but there is some chatter that they have another target in this virus is not going to stand oil companies. new fact. run a search on here? >> i think so. given "washington post" story says, probably something we have to worry about. [laughter] but now i think the general realization that we have not seen everything yet unfold, second that typical cyberattack activities are probably most crippling and undermining confidence of the public. and so, courses of action addresses of the public and how we'll do this. we haven't gotten a sense to the external oversees implications to the standpoint of other damage up there. i need to know from intelligence community what they know is that date from the ei, have forensics disclosed anything but give us a way to get ahead of the activity and recommended courses of action
, but you are engaging with countries for whom doing that is much simplerlike china, like russia, the state capital company where, you know, your company is your arm not only of foreign economic policy, but of foreign policy full stop. how do you operate in a world with players who are operating under these very different rules? >> well, it's something we do spend quite a bit of time thinking about this. it's not all about china. there are issues with other countries like -- >> russia? >> -- like russia, but not just those two. and the lines are really blurred in terms of where the state ends and where capital and corporate interests begin for many countries. at the state department, we've really tried to create mechanisms through multilateral institutions like the oecd has come up with a platform for competitive neutrality which looks at the different ways that governments can act to subsidize or to give favor to their own state-owned or state-led interests and provide some recommendations for engaging in a platform of competitive neutrality. it's a different way of thinking about the chal
in russia that are bundled up for this next report. >> winter came early to moscow and brought an unusual amount of snow with it. the city dispatched within 10,000 snowplows, but it was not enough. rush-hour traffic backed up for miles and moved at a snail's pace. 50 centimeters of fresh snow are expected by friday. some are pleased. others less so. >> it makes you feel happy. it reminds you of the new year and holidays. >> horrible. i think it is horrible. dirt and pedals everywhere. i do not like it. >> in central europe, things look similar. a cold front is moving from the south and east across germany. in bavaria, slick roads caused morning accidents. meteorologists say temperatures will remain cold and snow will blanket germany by the weekend -- perfect weather to visit the christmas markets. >> speaking of christmas, there is less than a month to go now -- can you believe it? before the holiday. the season would not be complete without the christmas tree at rockefeller center. the mayor himself hit the switch at the ceremony, which drew thousands of spectators. >> it is a tradition
, and he was the richest man in russia. kind of a bad way. and this is what he said to me about oligarchs and everybody else. if the man is not an oligarchic something is not right with him. everyone had the same starting conditions, everyone could have done it. and he really meant it. very heartfelt and not criticizing himself, he lost $100 million, he had stupidly entrusted a non oligarch. and this non oligarchic by definition not a smart guy, a few hundred million dollars. there is a little bit of that thinking a lot of these guys and it is interesting because very strong parallels, the parallel with the industrial revolution. there's a line from andrew carnegie which is very similar soak carnegie said the talent for organization is rare among men, approved by the fact that it is reward for its possessor. if a man is not an oligarch something is wrong with him. and services can be obtained as partner, the man whose service can be obtained as a partner for the first consideration such as render the question of his capital that we are considering. such men soon create capital and in the
to russia to die. when the germans surrendered and the japanese were pushed back to their home islandislands, the american propensity to safety or human life while wasting cheap bullets and bombs reached with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. virtually all of the relevant evidence, recent evidence for both american and japanese sources validates president harry truman's decision to drop both bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of the military realities, illustrated by the report of dr. machine off, japan's top atomic scientist who was sent to hiroshima the following day and had to report back to the emperor and he was asked was this an atomic bomb? then came the line, how long until we can make one? that is hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapons at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese that it was surrender or die. which surrender came to temporary victory in the principles of american exceptionalism worldwide. unlike all the previous
.s. intelligence has identified three command and control servers. one is in russia and one in the states that are sending commands to this virus and the u.s. intelligence has now at a later concluded with a high degree of confidence that this virus was developed by state-sponsored actors in excess land, and not in the high degree of confidence that there is a shadow out there that they have another target and that this virus is not going to stay on the leal companies that could move -- oil companies that could move. if you want to start? >> i think so, given the "washington post" sources we don't have to worry about. [laughter] but now i think one, the general realization that we have not seen everything yet sold, second, typical of the cyber type of activities they are probably most crippling in undermining confidence over the public so they need courses of action to address this in the public and how they will do this we haven't really gotten the sense of the external overseas type of the implications from the standpoint of other damage out there. we need to know from the intelligence
cost investments. ♪ >>> a couple other stories we're following this morning, russia's space agency has denied it lost communication with the international space station after a cable broke outside moscow. the story was first reported on state run news agency saying the broken kibl meant russia had lost the ability to control most of its civilian satellites. a spokesman was quick to assure that despite the broken cable, satellites and the station were continuing to operate normally. he also said the agency was able to communicate with the satellites and control them. plenty more coverage on this story at cnbc.com. further israeli strikes have killed three palestinians in the southern gaza strip this as three were killed in an auntment building in central israel, the first israeli fatalities since israel relaunched an offensive against gaza a day earlier. and the latest action came as the u.n. security council held an emergency meeting in new york to discuss the escalation of violence in the region. yesterday israel killed hamas' top military commander during air strikes. condemnation of
soldiers in vast numbers been sent to russia to die. when the germans surrendered in japanese are pushed back to their home islands, the american propensity to save dear human life are wasting cheap wallets and bombs reached at cnet with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. virtually all of the evidence -- recent evidence from american and japanese validates president kerry truman's decision to drop both bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality illustrated by the report of dr. machine. japan's top atomic scientist sent out to hear a shame that the following day and had to report back to the emperor and he was fast, was this an atomic bomb? then came the line, how long -- attended the response of some of the camp to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese study was surrender or die. when japan's surrender became the temporary picture of the principles of american exceptionalism worldwide. unlike all the previous empires commit the u.
into germany to sustain the war effort while german soldiers in vast numbers were being sent to russia to die. the germans surrendered in the japanese were pushed back to their home islands, and the american to save human lives while the statute votes and bombs reached its zenith with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. virtually all of the relevant evidence, recent evidence from american and japanese sources nowadays president harry truman's decision to drop those bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality illustrated by the report of dr. sheena. japan's top atomic scientist sent down to hear a shame of following day and had to report back to the emperor. he was asked, was this an atomic bomb? dan kim the line, how long until we can make money? is hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese it was surrender or die. became a temporary victory the principles of american exceptionalism worldw
into last night. all supposed to come together and have a moment, right? well, chafee has to russia deal through because he knows that even the people of rhode island maybe with the exception of brown think this is ridiculous, right? but this has been going on, bill, for about five decades now because traditional christianity and the churches for the most part have been resisting the great, you know, sexual revolution, the free love stuff and everything that came along with it the secular progressives and the elites and very powerful, they have sought mostly through using the courts to diminish traditional religion in the public square. and that means diminishment of first amendment rights in the public square. it trickles down to silly things like the charlie brown christmas pageant that a little rock school. >> bill: megyn kelly is going to handle that for us ahead. let me stop you for a moment though and just explain that the christmas tree lighting in providence, long island is usually a big deal and everybody knows that so they can bring their children. today, as i said in the tag f
, whether that's the multi-lateral process with russia, china, britain, fans, and germany involved, but also possibly see if there should be direct talks between the united states and iran. we haven't had those kind of talks really in three decades since the iranian revolution started, and i suspect, suzanne, he will have bipartisan support for that in washington d.c. and he will have a lot of support internationally now that the campaign is over. the big question is whether the iranian government will be willing to come in a serious way to the negotiating table. they have not shown that over the last couple of years. i think the pressure is actually going to be on the iranian government. >> do you think that the economic pressure on iran is coming to a breaking point here, a boiling point, where you will see iran come to the table? >> i think the sanctions are beginning to hit the iranian government very hard. both the e.u., oil embargo, the u.s. central bank sanctions, and just look at the indicators of that. the iranian riel, the -- it has been -- the ranian have been hit hard in their in
. if you go to russia and you put on discovery, it's putin's favorite channel. the people in russia think it is a russian channel so one, our content works really well but it's not just discovery. animal planet also universal, almost 90% of our -- when we develop a show for animal planet we take it everywhere in the world. i.d. as i mentioned has been very successful for us. it's a top ten network in america. in the last nine months we've launched it in over 130 countries. >> "honey boo boo" is not on france. >> tlc is a little different. animal planet, science, discovery, and now i.d., that content works. so we really have a different economic model. if we invest in a show like "gold rush" or we invest in a show with david salmani on animal planet, who will be here in a few minutes or susan lucci we take those shows around the world. those nichz, science is universal. tlc is more difficult. we have to do local content with tlc because it feels like an american channel. >> david is our guest host. we've been asking ceos and business leaders how they are planning for the end of the year wi
hd hasn't rolled out in turkey and russia. it's a big hedge for us. >> thank you for being here. >> appreciate it very much. join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee with carl quintanilla, david faber and jim cramer. we kick off the week better than we had seen last week. looking at a higher open across the board after the worse weekly losses with both indices closing below the 200-day moving average on friday. looking at the action over in europe, we are seeing small gains across the board. our road map starts on capitol hill where congress returns to work tomorrow as leaders prepare to meet with the president this week on the fiscal cliff. lawmakers over the weekend sound optimistic that a deal will be reached. how likely is that? >> jeffries gets bought in a $3.7 billion deal. leucadia is described as a mini berkshire hathaway. >> a war to see who will open earliest on black friday or on thanksgiving itself as it turns out. >> first up, after coming off the worst week for the markets
by all places russia. here's "the wall street journal's" translation of it. "the electoral system are contradictory archaic and moreover done meet the democratic principles that the united states claims are fundamental to its foreign and domestic policy." i hate to say, it but moscow has a point. on the one hand, we have one thing the russians don't, actual free elections. this election season we've seen attempts to shorten the early voting period to further one party's chances of victory. our ballots can be as long as a dozen pages. in some places they're paper ballots and in some they're electronic. and election day always falls on a tuesday, a working day. every four years we see the chaos of american elections, but nothing changes. this week international election observers were banned from nine states. some of these men and women were threatened with arrest. maybe we should start learning from election officials from abroad, not trying to throw them into jail. >>> up next, big data in the presidential election. why what you eat and what music you listen to has everything to d
by china, by russia, but others and look for them is one of the biggest is. well it's the u.s. not only national security secrets, the commercial seats as be of much of can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. it is a dire threat in part because we shifted so much attention, so much resource and the counterterrorism arena we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence and that's an important element of this. >> often i've heard some people involved in counterintelligence tends to be seen as the redheaded stepchild of the intelligence world. why is that when we need it and what is the cure for a? effect in part because it's something we don't want to think about. to think that our agencies and businesses have been penetrated by a foreign power, criminal organization and would rather think about how do we achieve that goal? a foreign-policy goal or profit objectives. but it's more fun. that is more positive and we are very positive nation. we can also be more disciplined about how we think of protecting our intellectual property and most of all our people. >> one of t
blamed missteps in countries such as brazil and russia for the miss. it assured the issues should be resolved by the end of the year. u.s. grocery chain whole foods has posted third quarter profits in line with forecasts. total sales jumped 24% in the period as consumers continue to switch towards organic produce. however the company did warn investors sales have been hit by the impact of hurricane sandy which left many of their customers without power. and that sent shares lower in after hours trade as you can see there, shedding about nearly 3%. we'll keep an eye on that. and just when new york city thought it was all over, a nor'easter called athena has smacked the tri-state area overnight dumping inches of snow over some of hurricane sandy's hardest hit areas. wind and heavy snow have brought down you power lines and electrical wires and thousands who lost power because of sandy just lost it all over again. now, caroline roth joins us from zurich because over in zurich, swiss re has reported results that have cheered the market. 1.6% at the moment. >> absolutely. earlier on in
the u.s. will overtake saudi arabia and russia to become the world's biggest global oil producer by 2017. this is the international energy agency. so becoming a net exporter. joining us is tom bergen at reuters. if that forecast is right, how does that change the politics of oil? >> good morning, ross. yes, that's a prediction now that a lot of analysts have been making over recent months. so it's a pretty broad view that the u.s. will by the end of the decade potentially become the biggest oil producer in the world. there are also predictions that just factory and other things like energy efficiency, basically cut it reliance on on oil imported from outside from immediate neighbors mexico and canada almost to nothing. and if america is not emporting as much oil as it does currently, perhaps for energy to be such a focal point of its foreign policy won't be so large. and already you have exactly within the oil and gas industry pushing the case for shale on the basis that it would save the country a lot of money on overseas military expenditure. >> if you take in that oil, shale gas toget
to russia and they're looking at markets like india. but they've not given up on europe, which will remain its key engine for growth. the european story is more nuanced than the eurozone crisis growth headlines would suggest. in fact, solaris has picked up new business in finland and belgium and will do record sales in spain this year. solaris management considers the company as much european as it is polish and believes the block is strongest staying together. so if the eurozone were a bus, say, none of the passengers should be forced to leave before the ultimate destination is reached. just setting aside for a moment the issue of trade into germany, the polish economy is clipping along at about 2.4% this year. it's expected to slow into next year. so what exactly is the central bank going to do to offset some of that weakness in domestic demand. i'm very pleased to have with me yang, on the committee, and also an academic economist. thank you for joining us. the central bank has been criticized by some for not cutting sooner and more aggressively. and the key policy rate still sits at 4.
with russia and south korea. securing important resources in the south china sea as well as potentially destabilizing or creating a situation in which china doesn't actually have full control of the south china sea for its exports and imports of oil and other natural resources into china. so the issue for the two countries is that being driven by very different factors. >> i know japanese businesses have sort of started to think about the cost benefit of doing business in china because the chinese government has demonstrated their ability to impact business. so i was talking to -- let's he's bring in andrew on this. i suppose the question is whether the chinese are feeling any pinch on their side. >> trade is not everything. don't forget it's not just a financial issue only between china and japan. don't forget the american pivot to asia has complicated things. and also of raising nationalism both in japan and china. a look at japanese politics recently, the current administration has weakened very much by the economy, but also by the rise of another political party and the political pa
there. >>> megaphone has made its stock market debut in london. but shares in russia's second lowest mobile operator are trading below $20 a share, the bottom of the anticipated range. the ipo is still the biggest by a russian company since 2010. so, hope you feel fully caught up on your global news now. >>> still to come, southeast asia's economies are coming up roses in the face of global uncertainties. what's driving them and will the momentum last? we'll find out next. >>> welcome back to the program. the bank of thailand has kept rates as expected. the central bank says the economy is this good shape and strong domestic demand will help counter risks from overseas. in the philippines, the governor of the central bank insists its easy policies are confident despite economic growth. it was well above expectations for growth of just 5.3%. for more on southeast asia, joining us now, economist at southeast asia at rbs. my apologies about that. i'm butchering names all morning. >> no problem at all. >> can you talk first at all about thailand in particular. investors look to this as a
the bomb on russia, which is a huge problem. so peter sellers in this movie playing numerous roles as he always does, he has to kind of coral all of these people in the government and try to stop this, the crazy war that's going to happen just randomly on one day. and this movie just keeps getting better with age because, you know, lines never stop being funny, as our world gets more and more ridiculous in real life. like george c. scott and the russian ambassador are fighting and peter sellers has to break it up by saying, you can't fight in here. this is the war room. >> i love it. >> and it's a classic. 1964. you are reaching back. not to confuse it with "dr. no." you start thinking about james bond movies, especially since we have been engamed in so much bond stuff with the release of the double-box set, but "dr. strangelove" a classic, a stand out in and of itself and your number one. >> yes, and thanks to my dad who showed this to me as a young age and taught me not to fight in the war room and show people the big boards. important lessons. >> thanks so much. always good to see you
! wow. i've he never seen anything other than in soviet russia to see this kind -- >> jim, jim -- >> what? david? >> is it too early to buy groupon? >> i've been debating that, and zynga. >> what is amazing, it wasn't that long ago, this company came public, marketed as a great growth stock. as melissa just said, there is no growth anywhere. it takes you back to a number of the ipos we know quite well, zynga, groupon, facebook to an extent, linkedin, this group never should have been public. before it went public they did that final round, raised $900 million and google was willing to pay them $6 billion for that company but they wouldn't pay it now. >> wow, wow. >> unbelievable. josh brown, frequent guest on "the halftime" today said they have destroyed 10 billion of a $12 billion original cap. this ipo was a war crime. >> a war crime? >> invokes nuremberg. >> have you mentioned, evercore going to $2 price target -- >> he starts by saying we missed our revenue expectations by meeting our operating profitability? wow. meeting what? meeting what? fiscal cliff. >> here on "squawk
them towards that will be huge. with issues in russia where radio free europe radio free europe basic or shut down its operations because they can't get the licensing because the government refuses to allow licenses to reading stations. we're going to see that. that to me, how we continue to use technology to push public diplomacy forward towards regimes that are going to use technology or intimidation to prevent that i think is going to really determine how the next four years ago. [inaudible] >> i would. it's a law that stops the state department from communicating with americans. it does present a lot of problems in an internet age. can i just add one thing? what p.j. said reminded me that i may have forgotten the most important legacy of all, and one of the things i meant to say here, which is i think that public diplomacy needs a big success. i think for public diplomacy to grow and become more important, we need to be able, the mecca people need to be able to point to something and say hey, that works. so for example, most americans believe that radio free europe helped bring do
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)